MEPAP Classes

MEPAP I & II classes are now forming for both traditional, online, and distance learning settings.

Dr. Debra Stewart is a NCCAP pre-approved instructor with over 25 years experience in long-term care.

Monday, August 18, 2014

Critical Thinking No. 13: Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs


 
 
Do you think your residents would be more likely to come to activities if their hierarchy of needs were met first?

35 comments:

  1. Residents are more likely to attend activities if their hierarchy of needs is fulfilled. The physiological needs involving survival appears first before the other needs that emerges into stages after. Physiologically to survive, humanity basic first instinct is to breathe, have food to eat, water to drink, shelter, and warmth to maintain body temperature. If a resident need to eat is not met, they are less likely to attend the activity session. The individual physiological need to eat could be met once their hunger is satisfied, and they are more likely to attend any activity program after. Safety needs like security, stability, and freedom from fear, is the next stage of Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs. The need to feel physically safe in any environment will determine if any of the elderly population is willing to participate in any event. Residents being transported to activity will less likely attend it if the individual coming to pick them up is someone new or unfamiliar. The odds of them attending increases with recognition of a familiar face which involves family, spouse, lovers and friends. The familiar facial recognition crosses into Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs to belong. The need to belong involves developing friendship with the same staff members over a period of time. Seeing the same staff members over and over usually make residents feel like they belong and the need to attend the activity program is met. If the resident attends activity and does not recognize other residents who are also participating, the feeling of belonging is usually lost. The needs will revert back to the feeling of being unsafe and the desire to physically be taken to the comfort of their own room. Self-esteem stage comes from the need to feel respected, mastery and achievement. Anyone with poor self-esteem usually will not attempt or participate in any form of activities unless they overcome that fear. Senior citizens who poses great self-esteem are likely to attend all activity sessions, enjoys socializing, try new things, and concurring everything from the in between. Self-actualization stage builds off of good self-esteem. In this stage residents will try new things, wanting to participate in everything, and are always anxious to attend all activities to find new potentials that they will develop through experiences. Most residents are likely to attend activities if their hierarchy of needs were met; however, their level of cognition could easily interfere with all of the stages.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Residents would be more likely to come to activities if their hierarchy of needs were met first. Although there are a lot of levels of needs, according to Maslow “independence and self- motivation are other traits of a self- actualized person…life, children, art, music, is appreciated (Activities Keeps me Going &Going, page 116). Although the self-actualized person is the last level of the pyramid, if residents are at that level of independence and creativity they are more likely to participate in activities. I believe you will find the more residents who are not as high on the pyramid of needs they have less self esteem, and do not want to participate especially in group settings. Looking at the pyramid on this blog is a bit different than in the book, however it can show the same thing. If a resident is on the first level of the pyramid and they are hungry waiting on lunch to arrive to their room, the chances of a successful 1:1 room visit are slim because they are thinking of their food, and not doing activities. After the resident has had lunch, their medication has been administered, and they have friends in the activity room asking them to come in, chances of them joining that activity are great. This hierarchy of needs does not only work for residents in facilities though. On a personal level, if I am driving by myself and starving because I got lost trying to get to the new shopping mall I am trying to find, chances of my agitation going up and my desire to not shop is great. Until my needs are met and I feel satisfied and secure it is hard for me to feel stable.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have seen both yes and no answers when it comes to participating in activities, even with self actualization being 100%. In my real life experiences some residents are a bit comfortable with their living situation and can do without activities. When I completed an assessment on a new resident she told me straight, she just likes to watch TV. She has a place to sleep, meds, food and staff to care for her. In her case she reached self actualization without activities. On the other hand I have residents that will not attend activities if they have not eaten, be changed, showered or hair combed. It could be their favorite activity and if one of those things is not complete she will not attend. Then we have those who absolutely depend on activities as a part of reaching self actualization. All the residents want the same thing, to feel loved and safe. There are few who have no family so the feeling of belonging is very important to them. I like to encourage all my residents to come to activities, even those who have vents or trach collars. This way no one is left out.

    ReplyDelete
  4. When it comes to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, most people in our industry do very well to provide their residents with the first three stages. It is easy to provide residents with their physiological needs for food, water, shelter, and warmth, and in most cases provide for their safety. The first two stages are what some consider "what the job is". There are fewer however that offer a sense of belonging, the ones that do provide this for their residents typically are considered to be going above and beyond "the job" and are recognized as employees who care very much. The self esteem aspect, or next stage is a bit tougher. Sure, everyone says great job when a resident does a project, but what about everyday life. Is it so difficult to tell someone how important they are in someones life, or how meaningful they are to someone or something and the recognition of achievement inst based on a task? I think this is very important to recognize in ourselves because it is the precursor to the final stage of self actualization. The question we must ponder, does a person reach self actualization and a sense of fulfillment if we only offer recognition of task based performance. To answer the initial question of this critical thinking, I would simply say, yes, but beside doing the job, make your residents feel important, and they will come.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Yes residents are more likely to come to activities if their hierarchy of needs are met first. One must meet the most basic needs before working to meet higher levels of needs in Maslow's hierarchy. Resident's needs of oxygen and nutrition will take priority over anything else. Other than safety and security, the rest of the needs are social and can be easily accomplished by allowing resident's to socialize with others. This is where the activities come in to play. Meeting their needs as displayed in the hierarchy will give a more positive outcome and end result when pursing individual and group activities.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Yes. When a resident (or any person) feels respected and their needs are being met, they are more likely to seek out programs and be active in the facility. They also seek to establish a role within the community, make friends, and express themselves. When basic needs are met and taken care of, residents are more open and passionate about meeting their other needs, belonging, self esteem, and self actualization-through active programming that involves their interests.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Yes, ideally, if the hierarchy of needs is met, I feel people would be more likely to come to activities. However, this can't always be the case (for people not in nursing homes too). It can be quite dificult to meet everyone's hierarchy of needs especially in a large facility. I feel that the staff do the best they can and meet the needs to the best of their abilities, and as Rec Therapists/Activity Professionals, we do a great job with belonging, self-esteem, and self-actualization. The nurses and aids do as well, but our main focus are those tiers on the hierarchy of needs. If we as Activity Professionals are able to really know our residents, help feel welcomed and loved, they will want to come out to activities to spend time socializing with friends, meet new friends, and feel that sense of belonging. Of course there are going to be those residents who even if their needs are met, still won't come out to activities. Perhaps they have a lifelong history of being a "loner", or just prefer to spend time in their room. Residents could be declining as well, have their needs met, but physically are unable to leave their room. This is where we would go in an do a 1:1 with them to ensure their needs are met.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I do believe that residents would be more likely to come to activities if all of their needs are met but I also believe that activities can help meet some of their needs as well.

    For example, if a resident has not had their most basic needs met such as food and water, they are not going to feel well enough or strong enough to attend an activity. If they don't feel safe in their environment, they are not going to open up to be able to experience the sense of belonging.

    On the other hand, I think activities can help meet some of these needs such as the need to belong. Most residents have experienced loss: loss of their independence, loss of a spouse, or loss of friends and family. In a long term care setting, activities can help reconnect a resident and give them a sense of belonging. New friendships can be formed and create a sense of love and belonging.

    I believe that as activity professionals, it really is our job to help residents reach the highest level: self-actualization. That way, we know that all of their other needs are being met as well. Through programming that offers spiritual, social, intellectual, physical, and emotional stimulation, we can help residents lead fulfilled lives.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Yes I do feel that residents would be more likely to attend activities if their hierarchy needs are met first. All human beings are more open to participating if they feel comfortable in their surroundings. If we have received food, water, shelter, we can feel like we can concentrate on the activity in front of us- whether that be conversation, physical skill or just being comfortable in our surroundings. If those needs are not being met then our minds focus on that deficit and cannot fully committed to the activity in front of us. Once these needs are met then can move on up the levels. We as activity professionals need to stress the importance to all staff members of the importance of meeting these needs so that our programming can provide for their best quality of life.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs can be divided into two categories: Basic needs and self-actualization. I believe that a resident's basic needs require fulfillment before they will attend activities. However, based on this being a motivational theory, if their self-actualization needs are already met, I think there is a lower probability that they will attend structured activities. At the same time, I don't think our needs are ever permanently met. In long term care I have found that while some residents are able to manage their self-actualization needs through self-directed activities, many rely on the activities programming to help them achieve their needs.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I actually do think if the residents' hierarchy needs are met they will more than likely attend activities. If their basic needs are met then they can focus more the attending and participating in the activities. I have a resident who feels like she is always busy. She is constantly worried about insurance issues and financial issues. It is very clear that she doesn't have anybody taking care of her. So she is constantly worried about her financial status. She feels like she does not have time to attend activities. At the moment her needs are not being met, so the activities department is not important to her.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Maslow's hierarchy is very important residents feeling safe in their own Lemon plays a major role if if they're going to participate in activities however making sure that the all grounds are cover such as food water family and shelter would more likely make residents fear of freedom and want to participate in activities that they feel that they can achieve and work very well with others.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Maslow's hierarchy is very important residents feeling safe in their own Lemon plays a major role if if they're going to participate in activities however making sure that the all grounds are cover such as food water family and shelter would more likely make residents fear of freedom and want to participate in activities that they feel that they can achieve and work very well with others.

    ReplyDelete
  14. If a person’s hierarchy of needs has been met, then I think they would be more likely to come to activities. People will be more likely to attend an activity if they are eating right, feel safe, have friends and are confident in themselves. When all of their needs are met then they can truly relax and have fun. If a person’s first level of needs is not met, then participating in activities is probably the last thing on their mind. Their main goal would be to find food and water. If a person does not feel safe or secure then they will not trust the people who lead the activities. This could cause them to immediately refuse any invitations to come to an activity. Since most activities are in a group setting, if a person does not feel like they belong then they probably won’t want to come. If someone feels they are unloved then they probably feel unwanted. They may think that people don’t want them to be there so they won’t go. Someone who has a low self-esteem probably won’t want to try new things to avoid embarrassment.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I do believe that residents are more likely to attend activities if their hierarchy of needs are met. Even though it is more likely though, it is not guaranteed. It depends on the person and the activity, their likes/dislikes, etc. In general though, I do agree.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Yes....if the residents met all of their Hierarchy needs, I feel they would be well balanced. They would more likely attend an activity function if they felt good with their well being. feeling safe, being able to trust people make friends. Expressing their opinions knowing they count. With the different levels of needs step by step could bring them out of their shell build self-esteem. Help them grow in a more positive attitude. I think the Maslow's Hierarchy Chart is a vital necessity in establishing a well balanced person.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I do think if the residents hierarchy of needs were met first they would be more likely to come to activities. I believe the resident would be able to feel more comfortable and last through the entire activity.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I do believe that residents are more likely to come to activities if all of their Hierarchy of needs are met. I also believe that activities can help meet some of their needs as well. I have some residents who refuse all activities unless food or drink is involved. So I do plan cooking sessions with the residents where they can make their favorite foods with me and then enjoy them when complete or even have them as one of their meals that day. For example we made bean soup in a cooker all day they were able to check on it, smell it cooking ect. This got a lot of residents involved that normally said no. Even if they were unable to cook anymore they used to and they gave me instructions on how to prepare the food or how they used to make it, which got them all talking and getting involved and having fun. I feel that if resident’s needs are not met they will not feel like doing anything else especially with staff they may feel is the cause of their need not being met. Also in some cases if a need is not, met that is all that is on their mind and they are focused on that and cannot focus on anything else. I feel that activities can help with the need to feel loved and have a belonging, by being around others and giving positive praise. I have several residents who tell me oh I am not creative, I can’t paint, I can’t whatever when I try to get them engaged in a craft. I always tell them that can’t is not in my vocabulary and you do not have to be perfect with anything we do as long as you try that’s all that matters. All crafts are each person’s own art and no one’s is ever the same and there is no right or wrong way. Once they engage with the activity they usually end up having fun and surprise themselves.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Absoultely. Its a must that the hierarchy needs are met. There has to be a sense of security. Once these needs are met residents are more open to coming to activities.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Yes, I do believe residents are more likely to attend activities if the hierarchy of needs are met first. It's human nature, You can't truly enjoy life or seek out entertainment when your basic needs aren't met. You don't have the energy to spare if your nutritional needs aren't met. And it's hard to think about pleasure when you are constantly afraid. And when you are alone and have no one who loves you, you feel worthless and have no desire for enjoyment. So yes, helping to ensure the basic needs are met will help give residents the desire and confidence to attend activities.

    ReplyDelete
  21. By meeting Maslow's hierarchy of needs, I feel that residents are more likely to come to activities. However, I do agree with the a post in the blog that there are some residents who are very happy without attending the scheduled activities. I have experienced this resident in assisted and independent living who does not come to scheduled activities but still maintains a fulfilling life.
    Basic needs must be met in all types of facilities. For example, if you are hungry, you will be less willing to participate in an activity and also worried that you may miss a meal. If one does not feel safe in the environment, there is also a fear related to this that you don't belong. Meeting Maslow's hierarchy of needs allows residents to fully participate and grow in activities.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I do believe there is a better chance they will attend activities more often if there hierarchy of needs are met but we also have to take into account the residents personality. We can meet every need on Maslow's hierarchy and the resident still will not attend activities. Depending on the residents life and personality will account for what type of involvement the resident has with activities. I have residents who attend activities daily and some who just watch Tv all day and I believe as long as the resident is happy and not showing signs of depression or anything along those lines then we need to respect their choice. Life is about choice and when residents enter into a Nursing Home environment "choice" seems to dwindle by the day.

    ReplyDelete
  23. If their hierarchy needs are met they are always more likely to come to activities. They will feel better, feel safe and secure. They would feel like they belong. If they have better self esteem they will be more likely to come.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I think the answer to this question is different for everyone. We have residents who are able to have all their needs met without activities, because they have so much going on with their families, and they have hobbies they enjoy doing in their room alone. These residents don't feel there need to come to activities because their needs are already met.

    On the other hand, we have many residents who depend on activities to meet many of those needs. Many of them need the socialization with other residents to feel they belong. They need the service projects we provide to feel they have meaning and purpose.
    Meeting each residents needs comes down to getting to know each resident. If we know what they liked doing in the past we can better cater out activity program to meet their needs. Each person has different talents and interests, so beyond the basic physiological needs each person's needs will be met in different ways.

    ReplyDelete
  25. The Coaching Centre is a Business coaching in Orange, Executive coaching in Orange,Small business coach in Orange,Leadership development management in Orange, Self-Actualising Programs in Orange,Team Management Programs in Orange.

    Self-Actualising Programs in Orange

    ReplyDelete
  26. I absolutely believe residents would be more likely to come to activities if their needs were met first. If a resident does not feel safe and secure in the environment, they will be more likely to try to elope. When a resident is trying to elope, you cannot get them to participate in an activity without first making them feel safe and wanted. Residents will also be more eager to participate in activities if they have their physiological needs met. If a resident is hungry or thirsty they will focus on finding food or a drink. If you give them something to drink or something to eat, they are more likely to participate in activities. Building relationships with your residents helps to meet the self-esteem part of the hierarchy. If residents feel that the activity staff respects them and the activity is something that they can succeed at they are also more likely to participate in activities.

    ReplyDelete
  27. I believe that a person is more likely going to come willingly and participate when they are meeting there hierarchy needs are being meant. That is not to say that there will not be some residents who still do not want to participate in activities. Just like there is some activities that individuals do not like. There are some individuals who do not want to participate in group activities. And there is a number of activities that help bring out the best life in an individuals life .

    ReplyDelete
  28. Tracey Taylor
    I do based on I do not believe anyone wants to someday live in an institution, no matter how well run that institution may be, that being said having to choose between one's wants and needs can be tricky and I say that based on previous experience. living in long term care everyone has the right to have their needs met. Maslow's Hierarchy of needs brings about the reality in which everyone need to feel, belong be treated with dignity, respect and more importantly love. That combination of needs as describe by the hierarchy is the foundation on which we all as a society must first embrace in order to be effective in any capacity.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I do believe that residents are more likely to attend activities if their hierarchy needs are met. Everyone needs a push from time to time. For example after a day of work, I would rather remain home and rest. However, family and friends would rather spend sometime together. Although, I would rather stay home, it is important to spend time with family and friends. This is no different with anyone even the residents. It is just like going swimming on hot day. You want to get into the pool but you know the water is cold. So you have some anxiety about jumping in. But we all know once you jump in it is no so bad. Once your in the water feels find. My belief is that as long as the hierarchy needs are met the residents will want to participate in activities. Some will need encouragement to jump in, and some will not choose to depending on if their hierarchy needs are met and feel that they will gain something from that activity.

    ReplyDelete
  30. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I believe that residents are more likely to attend activities if their hierarchy of needs of met. However, I don't think a resident needs to be fully self actualized to attend and enjoy activities. First and foremost, physiological and safety needs must be met before a resident can even think about joining and enjoying activities. Activities are often group based, so a resident who feels as though their sense of belonging and love is fulfilled is more likely to thrive in group activities (encouragement to attend from family and friends, a sense of companionship with peers, etc.) Residents whose self esteem needs are met are better able to interact with peers, join in activities, and even help contribute to activities overall. Lastly, I believe a a resident who is self actualized is best able to fully enjoy activities, help contribute or even start and lead their own resident run activities as a part of the facility's overall programming.

    ReplyDelete



  32. UnknownMay 15, 2019 at 6:31 AM

    Tracey Taylor
    I do based on I do not believe anyone wants to someday live in an institution, no matter how well run that institution may be, that being said having to choose between one's wants and needs can be tricky and I say that based on previous experience. living in long term care everyone has the right to have their needs met. Maslow's Hierarchy of needs brings about the reality in which everyone need to feel, belong be treated with dignity, respect and more importantly love. That combination of needs as describe by the hierarchy is the foundation on which we all as a society must first embrace in order to be effective in any capacity.
    ReplyDelete

    ReplyDelete
  33. i strongly believe that the residents would attend activities more if their hierarchy of needs are met. If they have more fulfillment and joy out of what they are doing then they are more happy and more likely to come to activities. no one wants to do something that they do not enjoy or their needs are not meet.

    ReplyDelete